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From: Riitta Harjula :      rharjula-at-cc.oulu.fi
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 14:38:54 +0200 (EET)

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Subscribe Riitta Harjula

Riitta.Harjula-at-oulu.fi




From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 11:39:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Confocal Scope in San Diego

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Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502011127.A7624-9100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
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I am in need of access to a confocal scope in the San Diego area. Would
anyone know of a lab that has one and who to contact? Thanks in advance
for your help.

Marc

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 16:45:52 EST
Subject: RE: EM Lab scheduling

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Jan Coetzee asks about electronic vs. "dog-eared diary" for schedules.
Dear Jan,
We use a large desk calendar ourselves. It seems easier, since there
are frequent changes, and everyone can check it instantly. I'm sure that a
calendar page on a computer might do as well, but when a user calls, we are
not always booted up, so it would take us more time than it does with paper
and pencil. If your scopes are computer-controlled, it might save some time
and/or effort to have schedules on the same computer--e.g. the computer could
dial a user you need to contact re schedule changes--but we have not thought
this to be worthwhile for us. Sometimes low-tech works very well!
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 17:43:19 EST
Subject: Peltier devices

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Jan Coetzee inquired about mfgrs of pltrs.
Dear Jan,
Melcor makes them. Their address, phone & fax are
1040 Spruce Street
Trenton NJ 08648-4587
United States of America (our USA)
(609) 393-4178 (phone)
(609) 393-9461 (fax)
One potential problem is that Peltiers have a limited delta-T, and can
get very expensive. I asked Melcor about setting up a cold stage for epitax-
ial deposition in a vacuum, and there was nothing which would get cold enough.
Furthermore, if you wish to thermostat the device, you need to use a cooler
which has a 100% duty cycle and output current proportional to the difference
between target and actual temperatures. We found this out when we installed
Peltiers in our darkroom as heaters/coolers to maintain developer temperature.
The intermittant current put out by the usual commercially available devices
blew the Peltiers out! Otherwise, Peltiers are marvelous devices. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: WayneWNB-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 22:28:40 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscope Pictures

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Message-Id: {25020121201502-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

G'day Subscribers...

I've received this request for help on locating micrographs
of bacteria. I could not help this individual. So is there
anyone out there that can?

Cheers....Nestor Z.
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
=====================================

P.S.

I'm working on concept of adding an Image Library to the Software
Library. When it's ready for contributions I'll post
a message to the Listserver....


====================================



I need an electron microscope picture of Methanosarcina barkeri and
Methanobacterium wolfei. I called the University of California at Berkeley
and they gave me your address. They said that they don't keep a file of
their past work and would charge $300 per picture to do the work again. I'm
fairly certain that the pictures already exist somewhere. I believe that
NASA may have some of them but I don't know who to ask there . Thank you for
any help in getting any pictures of the two bacteria.

------------------




From: T.K. Wilson :      WILSONTK-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 09:08:47 -500
Subject: Position Openning

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The following files have been delivered to you - please use
the eXtract command in the browser to work with them:

MARSALL.ASC (format: Text)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas K. Wilson wilsontk-at-MUohio.edu
Dept. of Botany
Miami University ! Miami was a University when
Oxford OH 45056 ! Florida belonged to Spain !
USA
513.529.4210 office
513.529.4243 fax








-------------- Enclosure number 1 ----------------
The following is posted as a favor to
Marshall University, and to any interested
applicants on the MSA-BBS. Please distribute this
message to any and all interested people you may
know.

I am not involved with this Supervisor search
in any way whatsoever (Other than having promised
to post this ASAP). Please contact Dr. W.B.
Rhoten directly at the address below (his E-mail
address is Rhoten-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu)




POSSITION OPEN


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTRON MICRSCOPY FACILITY


To supervise and perform day-to-day
operations of the Electron Micrscopy Facility and
assist students, research assistants, and
investigators. Participate in graduate level EM
Course.

Bachelor's degree including courses in
biological and physical sciences and at least 3
years experience in EM, or a Masters degree and at
least 3 years of relevant experience, or a Ph.D.
degree. Qualifications include comprehensive
knowledge of EM and ability to enhance educational
and research activities. Experience in image
processing and computers desired.

Qualified applicants should send a cover
letter, resume, and list of at least 2 references
to:

Dr. W. B. Rhoten
Dept. of Anatomy, Cell & Neurobiology
School of Medicine, Marshall University
Huntington, WV 25704-9388


For full consideration submit application by
March 1, 1995.

MARSHALL UNIVERSITY IS AN AFFERMATIVE
ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER






From: Richard Lee :      richard_lee-at-qmgate.anl.gov
Date: 2 Feb 1995 13:01:13 -0600
Subject: subscibe

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Message-Id: {n1420392126.63194-at-qmgate.anl.gov}

subscibe 2/2/95

subscribe, PLEASE!
12:46 PM




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:56:44 +1100
Subject: TEM:Staining glycogen in sections

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Message-Id: {199502022051.JAA12437-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

One of EM Unit users is studying developing Red deer. The samples we are
examining are skull and pedicle (developing antler) taken from the deer at
set time intervals over atwo year period. The samples are processed
routinely, ie glutaraldehyde fixed,decalcified, OsO4 post fixed, uranyl
acetate bloc stain, dehydrated and embedded in Agar 100 epoxy resin.

Our problem is that it now seems to be that the glycogen content is of some
significance to the investigation. Unfortunately the above process is not
ideal for showing the glycogen.
Some recently processed samples using potassium ferrocyanide with the
osmium are brilliant however we would like to enhance the glycogen in the
previous blocks.
Does anyone out there know a method to enhance "unstainable" glycogen in
ultrathin sections?
Thanks in anticipation.

Allan Mitchell
South Campus EM Unit
allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz






From: randy nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 1995 14:51:56 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Site for JCPDS

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Does anyone know of a site that I can download files from the JCPDS?
Randy Nessler
rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu







From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:31:16 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Convert PS files

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} I am looking for a way to convert my PostScript files into "regular" image
} files. Does someone know of such siftwares on either Mac or Unix platforms?
} Any information would be appreciated.
}
Do you mean postscript or encapsulated postscript? If postscript then
one of the postscript interpreters available should do it. I use one
an a PC called GoScript that outputs to TIFF files as well as
printers. I am not sure, but you should take a look at the GNU
Ghostscript interpreter that runs on virtually anything - certainly
on unix systems. If you mean encapsulated postscript (EPS) then just
import the files into a Mac word processor such as WordPerfect on
Microsoft Word and then copy and paste to whereever you want to.
+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:58:20 -0500
Subject: Bacteria Micrographs

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Group -
Responding to an inquiry from Nestor, Custom Medical Stock Photo is a
company which purchases micrographs and then sells them to publications, etc.
They have a considerable inventory - in microscopy, and a number "with"
bacteria.
Many readers may be interested in contacting them and explore the sale of
their micrographs. I have, of course, no financial interest in the company.

Custom Medical Storck Photo, Inc.
3819 North Southport Ave
Chicago, IL 60613
Tel.: 312-248-3200
Fax: 312-248-7427

Regards,
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today




From: Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST
Subject: Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.

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Message-Id: {1995Feb03.100340.2874650620-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (M)

Subject: Time: 9:45 AM
OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date: 2/3/95
Dear Microscopists,
Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where it might be obtained? I
have been told that it is no longer manufactured commercially. It might be
an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy control.
Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence standards
besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very convenient, but
they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein, and Texas Red
specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co. no longer
makes pre-mounted standards.
I have been managing the UCSF core flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab
for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I had no real QC for our 2
occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I need to establish QC
protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized fluorescence (one
scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular Cytogenetics
Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal references)
seem to be available.
Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
much. Kris Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu








From: John Kloetzel :      kloetzel-at-umbc.edu (John Kloetzel)
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 14:14:17 -0500
Subject: EM network

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subscribe microscopy kloetzel-at-umbc.edu

** JAK **

****************************************************************************
John A. Kloetzel, Ph.D. {kloetzel-at-umbc.edu}
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)
Catonsville, MD 21228-5329 USA
Phone: (410) 455-2247 or -3913 (Lab)
FAX: (410) 455-3875
****************************************************************************








From: Dr. William Dentler, University of Kansas, Dept. of Cell Biology,
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 15:24:59 -0600
Subject: fix pepper redux

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Message-Id: {m0raUmA-00011cC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu}

A few months ago a thread ran on fixation and embedding pepper contaminant
artefact in biological ultrathin sections. A colleague of mine read the Pepper
Summary I compiled and sent me the following fixation protocols that he has used
successfully without pepper. Notice the first one in which glutaraldehyde,
phosphate buffer AND OSMIUM are all mixed TOGETHER!

If anyone out there wants a copy of my Pepper Summary, contact me off-line at my
e-mail and I will zip a copy out to you.

------------------------------------------------------------------------


"1. For fixing cilia in mammalian trachea, I have used an "instant fixation"
method using a combination of osmium, phosphate buffer, and glutaraldehyde - in
the cold - for many years and have never seen the pepper described in the Pepper
Summary you sent to me. Right - all that stuff in the same buffer dumped on the
tissue. Works great, but may extract a bit of actin.

"The method I used was one described in a paper by Omnoto
and Kung in the J. Cell Biol 87:33-46. I think it uses 50 mM NaPhosphate,
pH 7.2, 2% OsO4, 2% glutaraldehyde. Add the Osmium just before you add
the tissue and fix on ice for 10 min. If you want, you can remove the
black fix after 10 min and add another slug of fix for another 10 min but
that is optional.

"Omoto and Kung used it to fix Paramecium and their cilia. I have used it to
fix mammalian trachea (with their cilia). The advantage is that it seems
to "freeze" cilia in position, as opposed to glutaraldehyde, in which cells
actualy swim for a dab before either being fixed or dying (we fix cells,
we don't kill them, do we?). The osmium does not penetrate for more than
a few cell layers but, with epithelial tissue or single cells, it does
not make much difference.

"I have never tried that fix method on Chlamydomonas or Tetrahymena. Over the
last year I have done a lot of embedding of Chlamy and have never seen pepper.
For those beasts, I find that cacodylate gives the best preservation of the
cytoplasm, although others find that phosphate buffer works fine too.
I do fix with glutaraldehyde in culture medium (pretty much phosphate buffer),
overnight in glut in cacodylate, rinse a few times in cacodylate, then
into 0.5-1% OsO4 in cacodylate for 30-60 min on ice, rinse with a few
changes of water and into uranyl acetate for a few hours prior to dehydrating in
acetone and embedding in epon.

"I've also tried another method in which you fix with glut in phosphate buffer,
rinse, then incubate overnight in uranyl acetate (in water) at 70 degrees
C. It works on Chlamy and avoids osmium. It is supposed to eliminate the
need for poststaining of sections, but I did not find this to be the
case. I believe that I once read that the reason for staining sections is
to put a dab of stain on structures at the last surface of the plastic
that the beam sees before blasting through the objective lens. I don't
know, but, for Chlamy, I usually use the more old fashioned method that I
gave you above. Pepper does not seem to be one of my problems."
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contributed to MICROSCOPY by:

--

Gib Ahlstrand, MMS Newsletter Editor
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 18:23:23 EST
Subject: Re: TEM film

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Dear Lucille,
I just got a number from Kodak for technical questions, but they could
probably direct you to a distributer. It is (800) 242-2424 x19. We usually
use a local vendor, National Graphics, but I have not noticed a great range
of prices with other vendors. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Dr. Edmund Glaser :      eglaser-at-umabnet.ab.umd.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 22:12:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM film

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I am not aware that "cheap" is an a.k.a. for "reliable". Please be kind
to the English language.

On Fri, 3 Feb 1995, Lucille A. Giannuzzi wrote:

} Can anyone recommend a reliable (a.k.a. cheap) U.S. vendor for TEM film?
}
} Thanks in advance,
} Lucille Giannuzzi
}
}
} *************************************************************************
} Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.
}
} Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng. phone (407) 823-5770
} University of Central Florida fax (407) 823-0208
} 4000 Central Florida Blvd. email lag-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu
} Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
} *************************************************************************
}
}
}
}




From: Karpura V Kommineni :      komminen-at-student.msu.edu
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 1995 12:32:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: immunolabeling of wood

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Message-Id: {9502051732.AA72211-at-student1.cl.msu.edu}

DDoes anyone know about work done on immunolabelling of wood tissue of fruit
trees. I'm interested in any kind of information I can get on fixation,
embedding and the labelling procedure. I plan to be using ProteinA-colloidal
gold to tag the antibody.I'll be using a confocal microscope for this study.If
anyone knows any work done in this area could you please send me the
references. Thank you in advance.
my email address: komminen-at-student.msu.edu






From: Ian Hall :      hall-at-me.udel.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 08:31:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: WDS Software

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,
We have recently acquired a scanning electron microscope with a
four crystal Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometer but the associated
computer system is rather old and probably not worth re-activating.
I know that there is software for the Macintosh, such as
"D.T.S.A." and "Flame", for ENERGY Dispersive Spectroscopy but my question
is "Is there any (Mac) software out there which can handle W(AVELENGTH)DS
spectral acquisition and processing?".
Any leads would be very much appreciated. Thanks.

Rick Hall
Materials Science Program
University of Delaware







From: Not Specified :      Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST
Subject: Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.

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Reply to: RE} Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.
Hi Kris,
Uranium glass slides can be purchased from:

Newport Industrial Glass, Inc.
1631 Monrovia Ave.
Costa Mesa, CA 92627
Tel: 714-642-9980
Fax: 714-645-6800
Contact person: Bill Larsen (you can tell him I sent you).
Sold as a 6.5x6.5" sheet (you can specify 1 mm height), so you may want to form
a "consortium" to have Newport pre-cut a sheet to slide size (nominal extra
cost, but your lab only needs one or two slides). If there is a lot of
interest, my company may start selling single slides.

As for references and the Shading Correction equation: please see my article in
the 11/94 issue of Journal of NIH Research 6(11): 80 (usual Internet
disclaimer: yes, that is an ad from my company on the facing page). Also look
at Jericevic et al (1989) Methods in Cell Biology 30:47-83.

MutliSpeck beads: The Molecular Probes pre-mounted slide kits should be ideal
for DAPI and Fluorescein. I believe they were optimized for Rhodamine, but
should still work ok for Texas Red. If your problem is with mounting, Mol.
Probes now sells the beads in solution, so you can 'sprinkle' some on your
specimens. If you have a different problem with the current MultiSpeck's, Mol.
Probes may be able to work something out for you.

Sorry, but I usually buy my reference material from Mol. Probes and don't keep
close track of other slide manufacturers.

Sincerely,

Dr. George McNamara
Universal Imaging Corporation
George_M-at-Image1.com
--------------------------------------

Subject: Time: 9:45 AM
OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date: 2/3/95
Dear Microscopists,
Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where it might be obtained? I
have been told that it is no longer manufactured commercially. It might be
an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy control.
Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence standards
besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very convenient, but
they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein, and Texas Red
specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co. no longer
makes pre-mounted standards.
I have been managing the UCSF core flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab
for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I had no real QC for our 2
occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I need to establish QC
protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized fluorescence (one
scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular Cytogenetics
Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal references)
seem to be available.
Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very
much. Kris Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu











From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 13:53:07 -0500
Subject: subscribe

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Subscribe, please.

Thanks,

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: Deborah Holmberg :      dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 11:01:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Scanning 95 meeting

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The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting want about 25
student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions in
exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact:
Mary K. Sullivan
FAMS, Inc
P.O. Box 832
Mahwah, New Jersy
07430,0832

or leave me a message.
Debe Holmberg e-mail {dlholmberg-at-peseta.ucdavis.edu}
Lab 916-752-9021
FAX 916-752-4604




From: David Leaffer (415)852-1828 :      David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com
Date: 06 Feb 1995 11:56:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM Calibration

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Return-receipt-to: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com
Registered-mail-reply-requested-by: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com

I am going to be working on an TEM project that will be under "GLP" . GLP are
guidlines for doing certain experiments for the FDA (I think the equivalent in
Europe is ISO 9000). I was wondering if anyone out there is doing TEM under
these guidlines? And if so what are they using for magnification calibration.
I do not believe that there are any vendors who can supply a certified
magnification standard for TEM, which, I think is required for GLP.

Thanks,
David Leaffer
Syntex Research
david.leaffer-at-syntex.com





From: Deborah Holmberg :      dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 16:38:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Scanning 95 meeting

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The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting want about 25
student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions in
exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact:
Mrs. Mary K. Sullivan
FAMS. Inc.
P.O. Box 832
Mahwah, NJ 07430-0832


or leave me a message.
Debe Holmberg
Lab 916-752-9021
Fax 916-752-4604
dlholmberg-at-peseta.ucdavis.edu





From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:50:28 +1100
Subject: Academic role

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Dear All,
We are are multi-user electron microscope facility which has an extensive
range of equipment and uses a wide range of techniques.
Five technical staff from three contributing University departments are
employed full-time to undertake for work coming from both inside and
outside the University.

The role of the 'academic in charge' of the facility is shortly to come up
for reassessment and so it is a pertinent time for us to reconsider what
that role should entail.
We are looking for feedback from other individuals as to what they see the
contribution of an academic in this environment should be.
Any opinions/suggestions?






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 21:59:52 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Post Doc In Tribology

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From: wabutter-at-ix.netcom.com (Wayne A. Buttermore)
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 20:03:15 -0800
Subject: subscribe

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Message-Id: {9502071626.AA16923-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}

Subscribe





From: Peter Goodhew :      goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 08:43:25 GMT
Subject: Re: Academic role

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} The role of the 'academic in charge' of the facility is shortly to come up
} for reassessment and so it is a pertinent time for us to reconsider what
} that role should entail.
} We are looking for feedback from other individuals as to what they see the
} contribution of an academic in this environment should be.
Easy -
1. Keep abreast of all techniques which a) you have, b) exist, and c) potentially exist.
2. Be an expert practionioner of two or more of these. Publish a lot in your own name.
3. Give advice on the application of all techniques and on the high-level interpretation of all results. Publish
jointly with others.
4. Raise funds to replace equipment and to buy new techniques as they become applicable.
5. Make sure all users publish, and tell you about it!
6. Establish a reputation as a scientist in some major subject area, not just as a microscopist. Publish a lot.
7. Keep friendly with the heads (or budget controllers) of all potential user departments.
8. Get to know lots of people in your institution by playing sport/drinking/etc with them.
9. In your spare time, publish some more.

I offer this advice after 20 years of running such a facility!

Peter Goodhew



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Professor Peter J Goodhew, Department of Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
LIVERPOOL Fax (44) (0)51 794 4675
L69 3BX, UK Tel (44) (0)51 794 4665 (secretary Debra)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
inter alia: Director of the MATTER project for educational software
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: Philip.P.Edge-at-ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:11:01 +0000
Subject: Subscribe

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From: Philip.P.Edge-at-ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:14:29 +0000
Subject: Bioimaging

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Institute of Physics Publishing
Techno House Tel: +44 272 297481
Redcliffe Way Fax: +44 272 294318
Bristol
BS1 6NX England Telex: 449149 INSTP G


E-mail Contact Details
----------------------
Internet : {mailbox} -at-ioppublishing.co.uk
Janet : {mailbox} -at-uk.co.ioppublishing
X400 : /s= {mailbox} /o=ioppl/prmd=iopp/admd=0/c=gb/

IOPP Internet services
----------------------
Gopher : gopher.ioppublishing.com
WWW Url : http://www.ioppublishing.com

Dear Moderator

I am the Publisher of the journal Bioimaging which I hope you have heard
of. I would like to place information about the journal, including tables
of contents, on your bulletin board. Will this be possible and how should I
do it?

Best wishes, Philip Edge.




From: jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu (James V. Jester)
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 1995 12:10:01 -0600
Subject: Lab Design

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Several years ago there appeared an article in Science discussing
laboratory space design and a recent "New" model being implemented in
England. Does anyone remember this article, and what has happened
to the English experiment?






From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 10:04:15 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Timelapse Cell Culture Movies

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Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Functional Neuroimaging List {lat-at-po.cwru.edu} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} ,
Cell Bio List {cellbiol-at-net.bio.net}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502081015.B14211-a100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Can Anyone point me to sources (free to minimal cost) of analog (VCR tape)
or digital timelapse movies of cells in culture? This is not for
commercial use, only presentation demonstration. Of course I would credit
each source in the presentation. Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

Marc

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830





From: evansnd-at-ornl.gov (Neal D. Evans)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:17:21 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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Subscribe Microscopy evansnd-at-ornl.gov

Dr. Neal D. Evans
Shared Research Equipment Program
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Building 5500, MS 6376, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376
voice(615-576-4427) fax(615-574-0641) email(evansnd-at-ornl.gov





From: stuw-at-lanl.gov (Stuart Wright)
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:22:29 -0700
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

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Message-Id: {9502081818.AA09732-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov}
X-Sender: stuw-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?


+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+






From: Daniel E. Sampson :      des-at-rupture.ucsc.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:22:29 -0700
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

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Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?


+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+




------ Forwarded message ends here ------


*******************************************************************
Daniel E. Sampson dsampson-at-earthsci.ucsc.edu
Instrumentation Specialist Phone: (408) 459-4992
Earth Sciences FAX: (408) 459-3074
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
*******************************************************************




From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 17:34:11 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: Reconditioned SEMs

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Stuart,
Have you tried contacting the instrument manufacturers themslves? I
believe that JEOL and Hitachi, for instance, may sell the
reconditioned SEMs that comes in on trade-ins. Failing that, give
us a call, we'll try to direct you to more sources.

Ellie Solit,
Publisher of MICROSCOPE TECHNOLOGY & NEWS AND
THE MICROSCOPE BOOK


On Wed, 8 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:

} Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?
}
}
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
} | Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
} |.........................................................|
} | Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
}
}




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 16:43:19 +1100
Subject: Academic role

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Message-Id: {199502090437.RAA16024-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear All,
Further to my message of 8.2.95, thank you very much to those who have
responded so candidly to my request for people's feelings and experiences
on this topic. I appreciate that it can be a sensitive issue, not helped
when one is replying to someone who doesn't even identify themselves
properly.
As I neglected to state who I am and where I work (I changed computers days
ago and forgot to put the automatic signature on - the ramifications of
this I am just becoming aware of...) that info now follows.
Maybe now I'll get some more replies...

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254






From: Kathy Walters :      kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 07:17:27 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Neg stain of lipids

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,

I have been asked to do particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)
and had hoped to be able to do a very quick negative staining procedure as
this may need to be run frequently. I toyed with the idea of freeze
fracture, but the time involved is not convenient for lots of runs. Has
anyone tried this? What stains would you suggest? Is Osmium
vaper fixation nessecary?

Thanks for any help!
Kathy Walters






From: stuw-at-lanl.gov (Stuart Wright)
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 09:06:22 -0700
Subject: reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {199502091342.AA01519-at-mail.mmmg.com}

Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?



+---------------------------------------------------------+
| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
|.........................................................|
| Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
+---------------------------------------------------------+






From: Jay Jerome :      jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 11:10:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Neg stain of lipids

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We have considerable experience with negative stain of phospholipid
vesicles, lipoproteins, and triacylglyceride emulsions. In these
circumstances fixation is not critical, and in fact can produce
artefacts. PTA stain seems to work best. We concentrate our sample on
grid by drying multiple drops under gentle nitrogen gas stream prior to
negative stain. This avoids clumping in the suspension. Some sizing
artefacts can occur as dryed particles of large size can deform slightly.
See Ganz et al, 1991, J Lipid Res 31:163 for nice discussion of this.
Good luck-


Jay Jerome
**************************************************************
* aka: W. Gray Jerome *
* Dept. of Pathology *
* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *
* Medical Center Blvd *
* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 *
* 910-716-4972 *
* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu *
**************************************************************

On Thu, 9 Feb 1995, Kathy Walters wrote:

} Dear Fellow Microscopists,
}
} I have been asked to do particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)
} and had hoped to be able to do a very quick negative staining procedure as
} this may need to be run frequently. I toyed with the idea of freeze
} fracture, but the time involved is not convenient for lots of runs. Has
} anyone tried this? What stains would you suggest? Is Osmium
} vaper fixation nessecary?
}
} Thanks for any help!
} Kathy Walters
}
}
}




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 09 Feb 1995 12:06:33 EST
Subject: Re: Neg stain of lipids

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Dear Kathy,
Staining is not really my field, but I'd suggest a water-soluble heavy
metal and NO osmium. The Os would only dissolve in the lipid and reduce con-
trast. If possible, looking at a frozen, hydrated (or lyophyllized in-situ)
specimen would be best. You don't specify either the matrix of the emulsion
(I assume aqueous) nor the technique to be used (I assume TEM), but a possible
protocol would be to add the stain to the emulsion and rapidly freeze, then
cryo-section, examine on a Friday, raise the temp to ~-90C, come in Saturday
and raise the temp to -80C, Sunday to -70C, and look at the freeze-dried spec-
imen Monday. If you can do the particle sizing from the frozen-hydrated spec-
imen, the last steps can be omitted. Keeping the stain strictly in the aqueous
phase should prevent size changes, etc. in the lipid drops. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: jacobb-at-ux5.lbl.gov
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:50:06 -0800
Subject: Re: Reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stuart,

E.J. Fjeld Co,
3 Executive Park Drive
North Billerica MA 01862
Phone 508-667-1416

Provides reconditioned AMRAY microscopes. They also make special stages and
accessories. They've been around for a long time and are reliable.

Jacob Bastacky, MD
1-116
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-lbl.gov
University of California Phone: (510) 486-4606
Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 15:20:13 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stuart, my attempts to reply to your question by email have resulted in 6
notices of undelivered mail. I left a voice message on your phone this
morning. I think we can help you in your search.

Regards,
Ellie Solit, Publisher/Executive Editor of Microscope Technology & News
and The Microscope Book, a Smart catalog.


On Thu, 9 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:

} Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?
}
}
}
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
} | Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
} |.........................................................|
} | Mail Stop G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |
} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505) 667-5268 |
} +---------------------------------------------------------+
}
}




From: Jean Armour Polly :      jpolly-at-nysernet.ORG
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:00:28 -0500
Subject: Apple QuickTime Conferencing

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Message-ID: {95020916094142E.RQDA-at-USCN.USCN.UGA.EDU} (UMass-Mailer 4.04)
Neuroscience List {neur-sci-at-net.bio.net} ,
Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,
Digital Video List {digvid-l-at-ucdavis.edu} ,
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} ,
Cell Bio List {cellbiol-at-net.bio.net}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502091131.A22203-e100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I thought this post should be quickly disseminated.

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830

---------- Forwarded message ----------


THE FOLLOWING RELEASE MOVED OVER PR NEWSWIRE ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1995 AT
11:42 AM, PST.


Contact:
Julie Karbo
Stirling & Cohan
(415) 513-0974
e-mail: jkarbo-at-applelink.apple.com

Brooke Cohan
Stirling & Cohan
(415) 513-0973
e-mail:cohan-at-applelink.apple.com

Apple Announces QuickTime Conferencing
Open, Cross Platform Conferencing, Collaboration and Multimedia
Communications Technology

SAN FRANCISCO, California--February 7, 1995--Apple Computer today
announced a cross platform conferencing, collaboration and
multimedia communications technology that allows personal computer
users to share real-time information, images and sound anywhere in
the world. Apple is currently making the technology, called
QuickTime Conferencing, available to corporate allies who plan to
create or have announced they are creating end user applications
based on the technology. QuickTime Conferencing is a standards-
based architecture that allows users to:

-- video conference and collaborate--to share and annotate text,
images, screen capture, sound, video and virtual scenes real-time
among fellow conference participants in a variety of locations
worldwide. QuickTime Conferencing allows users to record
conversations and transform those conversations into QuickTime
movies. All of this can be done on a variety of networks such as
an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the worldwide
internet, local area and wide area networks and Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. QuickTime Conferencing can be used
by a number of simultaneous users, the total number being only by
available network bandwidth.

-- conduct cross platform video conferencing connectivity
between Macintosh computers, PCs, UNIX systems and room-based
conferencing systems through the use of the H.320 worldwide
teleconferencing standard.

-- broadcast and view multimedia content--digital audio, music
and video on a local or wide area network.

Through alliances QuickTime Conferencing technology is expected to
yield product bundles such as:
-- Apple Media Conference Kit--Consisting of the QuickTime
Conferencing system extension, the Apple Media Conference
application and a high quality, color video camera.
-- Apple Media Conference Pro Kit--Consisting of the QuickTime
Conferencing system extension, the Apple Media Conference
application, a color video camera and an H.320 codec/ISDN adapter
board. Being developed by Sagem/SAT, a leading international
communications product company, the board is designed to allow
interoperability between platforms (Power Macintosh to Macintosh,
PC, UNIX and room systems) and full-screen image sharing.
--Complete Media Conference System--Consisting of an Apple Media
Conference Kit, a Power Macintosh 7100 AV, a 17 inch color
monitor, external speakers and a keyboard.

Because QuickTime Conferencing is software-based, it is easily
incorporated into new and existing third party products. As such,
Apple believes that QuickTime-compatible products could yield
extremely affordable prices:
-- Apple Media Conference Kit--under $200
-- Apple Media Conference Pro Kit--under $1,750
-- Complete Media Conferencing System--under $6,000

Apple is working with a wide range of companies including telcos,
network, software and hardware providers and developers to provide
a range of solutions that take advantage of the benefits of
QuickTime Conferencing (see associated releases). These allies
have announced that they expect to make products available in the
second quarter of 1995.
From the home office to university campuses to the multinational
enterprise network, QuickTime Conferencing will allow users to
communicate with people across the country or across the world.
Users won't have to worry about whether their hardware equipment,
networking equipment and applications are compatible with the
solutions being used on the other end of the network line.
QuickTime Conferencing is designed to be fully operational with
H.320 standards-based systems.
"The introduction of QuickTime Conferencing will not only extend
Apple's leadership in multimedia, but will make an important
difference in the video conferencing and collaboration market,"
said Rick Shriner, vice president of Apple's Core Technologies
Group. "Our goal in designing QuickTime Conferencing was to
develop a solution that allowed people the opportunity to
communicate and collaborate. By making it open in every sense of
the word, our users can metaphorically break down the walls of
their homes, schools and offices and expand the boundaries of
their lives."
QuickTime Conferencing users can have access to people,
information, sights and sounds that could never be combined
before. For example:
-- An author in Tokyo, Japan and her publisher in San Francisco,
California can view and discuss cover art for a new novel. They
can each view the design at several different angles, change
the visual perspective of the artwork, and annotate the image and
accompanying text for the other to see.
-- A sixth grade class in Dallas, Texas can discuss and view the
effects of global warming with an environmental scientist at U.C.
Berkeley's Lawrence Labs in California by using QuickTime
Conferencing over the internet.
-- A special effects producer in Hollywood, California can take a
movie director on the East Coast through a virtual tour of a
proposed set design. While the producer records their discussion
as a QuickTime movie, the director can pan around the scene, zoom
in to look at props and view the set design from a variety of
angles.
-- A breast cancer patient and her doctor in Fargo, North Dakota
can consult with a leading oncologist in Boston, Massachusetts on
her prognosis and course of treatment. The Boston physician can
view her mammograms and annotate her medical chart as they
converse.
-- A CEO's company-wide address can be broadcast for easy viewing
by all employees at their personal desktop.

Because QuickTime Conferencing allows for sharing of multimedia
data and reduces the time and expense of travel, it allows people
to be more productive than ever before.
"In the past people found video conferencing easy to resist
because prices were high and the number of people they could
communicate with was extremely limited," said Rick LeFaivre,
senior vice president of the Apple Technology Group. "Now for
what we expect to be very aggressive prices, people can conduct a
media conference with virtually anyone, anywhere in the world. A
Power Macintosh QuickTime Conferencing user can share QuickTime VR
(virtual reality) images, annotate text documents and share digital
music over networks from basic rate ISDN to the internet to ATM."
Because QuickTime Conferencing is a software-based architecture,
application developers, communications providers and hardware
vendors can easily develop compatible solutions. For example,
Crosswise Corporation, the maker of Face to Face, a cross-platform
document conferencing application, developed a QuickTime
Conferencing-compatible version of their software in just one
month. A QuickTime Conferencing compatible application shares the
interface of other QuickTime Conferencing-enabled third party
applications, so customers can begin using applications quickly
and easily.
QuickTime Conferencing is based on Apple's award winning QuickTime
technology. It is a conferencing architecture which allows
support for both industry standards such as H.320, as well as
proprietary architectures, and codecs such as Indeo by Intel
Corporation. QuickTime Conferencing is transport, compression and
media-device independent. Apple's built-in AV capabilities
combined with the performance of the PowerPC RISC architecture,
make it easy for users to make multimedia connections with others
on the information superhighway almost as soon as they pull
QuickTime Conferencing out of the box.
"Having QuickTime Conferencing available in my home, office, and
studio literally allows me to be in multiple locations at one
time--it's the next best thing to having a Star Trek transporter,"
said Los Angeles-based screenwriter and multimedia special effects
consultant Michael Backes, co-author of the screenplay for
Jurassic Park and other motion pictures. "Within the next few
months, I'll be counting on QuickTime Conferencing as the backbone
for my business."
"The short and sweet of QuickTime Conferencing is that it requires
less network bandwidth and uses innovative technology," says Matt
Ghourdjian, National Director of Technology at Howrey & Simon, a
300-lawyer law firm serving Fortune 50 clients. Howrey & Simon
intends to use the product to send QuickTime movies of depositions
and re-enactments for lawyers to use in court; for live document sharing;
for consultation between partners; and to conduct tours of the firm's
Washington, DC office from Los Angeles. "It's simply outstanding," says
Chris Masten, Howrey & Simon's Technical Litigation Support Manager.
To use the Apple Media Conference Kit on the Macintosh, users need
at least 16 Megabytes of RAM, a 68040 or PowerPC-based Macintosh,
System 7.5, a network interface such as Ethernet, ISDN, Token
Ring, and optionally the ability to digitize audio and video using
the built-in AV subsystem or a third party digitizer card. To use
the Apple Media Conference Pro Kit on Macintosh, users need at
least 16 Megabytes of RAM, an AV PowerPC-based Macintosh and an
ISDN connection. To communicate with QuickTime Conferencing users
from the PC and other platforms, users will need an H.320
compatible codec on their machine, available from a variety of
vendors. QuickTime Conferencing technology is currently under
development and products using the technology have not yet been
completed. Apple will provide pricing and availability
information when products are completed and ready for release.
Apple Computer, Inc., a recognized pioneer and innovator in the
information industry, creates powerful solutions based on easy to
use personal computers, servers, peripherals, software, online
services, and personal digital assistants. Headquartered in
Cupertino, California, Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) develops, manufactures,
licenses and markets products, technologies and services for the
business, education, consumer, scientific & engineering and
government markets in over 140 countries.


-30-

Apple, the Apple logo, QuickTime and Macintosh are registered
trademarks and Power Macintosh is a trademark of Apple Computer,
Inc. Additional company and product names may be trademarks or
registered trademarks of the individual companies and are
respectfully acknowledged.

END

Applelink pathway:
News Break
Apple & Industry News
PR Express
Apple Press Releases
2/7/95













From: Dascorr-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 10:38:26 -0500
Subject: Reconditioned SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I know of a company that reconditions old AMRAY SEMs. The owner used to work
at AMRAY before starting his own company. Company is E.J. Feld located in
Massachusetts. I can give you the phone on Monday, 2/13 when I return to
work.
Dr. David A. Shifler
Powell Labs Ltd.
Baltimore, MD 31231
(410) 327-3500
(410) 327-7506 (FAX)




From: Liang, Long :      LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM
Date: 10 Feb 1995 11:07:11 CST
Subject: Books-- EM & Geology ?

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Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.061405110095041FMACMS-at-IS.ARCO.COM}


Dear Microscopists,

Does anyone know if there is any recent books about applications of
microbeam techniques to mineralogy and petrology?

The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of Canada
(Short Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.

Thanks in advance.

Long LIang
ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
PLano, TX






From: JoRita Jordan :      jjordan-at-world.std.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:27:19 +0001 (EST)
Subject: TEM comments sought

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TEM users:

Thanks to all the replies to my recent TEM survey, I am well on my way to
preparing the survey for publication. I need some information -- I'm a
chemist, not a microscopist -- What do TEM users see as important trends in
TEM? New technology? Important applications? Is there other technology that
is replacing TEM in any way. How important are accessories like EDS and
EELS? For what uses?

Any comments on today's TEM would be greatly appreciated -- I'll send a copy
of the survey to any contributor.

Jo Rita Jordan
Analytical Consumer




From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:50:01 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed

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Does anyone in the group have the phone number for PRESENTATION
TECHNOLOGY? We are in the information gathering stage for the purchase
of a 35mm slide maker and the phone number we have (408-774-3733) is not
correct.

Thanks for your help.

Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(602)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 22:41:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed

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help

Peter D. Barnett - Forensic Science Associates - Richmond CA
pbarnett-at-crl.com VOICE: 510-222-8883 FAX: 510-222-8887






From: timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl (Timon Fliervoet)
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 08:24:35 +0100
Subject: Re: Books-- EM & Geology ?

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Message-Id: {n1419587852.54350-at-qmgate.anl.gov}

} Dear Microscopists,
}
} Does anyone know if there is any recent books about applications of
} microbeam techniques to mineralogy and petrology?
}
} The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of Canada
} (Short Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Long LIang
} ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
} PLano, TX


Try:
McLaren, A.C., 1991, TEM of minerals and rocks, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge

Boland, J.N. & FitzGerald, J.D. (eds), 1993, Defects and processes in the
solid state: geoscience applications, Developments in Petrology, Vol 14,
Elsevier, Amsterdam

Buseck, P.R. (ed), 1992, Minerals and reactions at the atomic scale: TEM,
Mineralogical Society of America, Reviews in Mineralogy, vol 27.

Cheers Timon

------------------------------------------------
Timon Fliervoet, Timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Department
of Geology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.021 3508 TA Utrecht, the
Netherlands.
tel: ++31 30 - 535054, fax: ++31 30 - 537725






From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 09:29:32 -0500
Subject: Need TEM analysis

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Help please!! SiSTek is looking for TEM analytical services in the
southwestern US, preferably in the Phoenix metropolitan area where we are
located. We are a company that provides consultant services to a number of
manufacturers of Si-related deposition systems and need *local* (turnaround
time and iterative analysis is important for our clients) TEM support. We
believe there is a company in the Phoenix area offering TEM services, but
can't find the name. Does anyone know the name/contact?

Many thanks,

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: ckblack-at-dow.com (U096585)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 11:03:19 -0500
Subject: mycoplasm in cell culture

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Hello folks.....

This may not be the correct forum for the
following query, however, any info out there would
be greatly appreciated.

We are interested in microscopy techniques,
testing procedures, staining , etc., for detection
of mycoplasm in cell cultures.

Thankyou in advance.

Cary Black (ckblack-at-dow.com)
Dave Williams

The Dow Chemical Company




From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 14 Feb 1995 09:05:10 -0800
Subject: Ecomet Polisher for sale

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Message-ID: {n1419369693.44281-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 9:13 AM
OFFICE MEMO Ecomet Polisher for sale Date: 2/14/95

FOR SALE: ECOMET 1 8" Polisher/grinder, complete with various polishing
discs, alumina and lapping oil. 115 volt, 5 amp, new price in 1988 =
$1250.00
Best offer.
Call Doug Davis of EM Lab at UC Berkeley at (510) 642-2085
or e-mail: doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu






From: jad1-at-cec.wustl.edu (Joe DeMaro)
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 12:02:43 -0600
Subject: SEM well plates

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Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture plates would be
greatly appreciated.

Joe
Joseph A. DeMaro
Washington University Medical School
Department of Neurology
660 S. Euclid
Rm 212 Biotech
St. Louis, MO 63110
jad1-at-cec.wustl.edu
314-362-9448





From: Self :      SALES/GREGB
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:25:54
Subject: Re: printers for gray scale prints

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Forwarded message:

All,

LaserMaster Corporation - Imaging Division is the ONLY company
that manufactures a 1800 dpi plain paper laser printers. I work for
LaserMaster and have just completed printing the 100/300 dpi Round
Robin Greyscale Test images. If you are interested in obtaining
them, you may e:mail me at Gregb-at-Sales.LMT.com and I will mail you a
printout of the test images from the LaserMaster printer. I can be
reached at 1-800-950-6363 Ext: 3207 if you have questions about your
specific situation and resolution needs.

Thank You all,
Greg Begin - LaserMaster Corp.
Scientific/Medical Imaging Div.
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

} Date sent: Thu, 09 Feb 95 07:42:30 -600
} From: Supratik_Guha-at-mail.mmmg.com (SG)
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: printers for gray scale prints

} I am looking around for a gray scale printer to attach with our Gatan
} slow scan CCD image aquisition system and would appreciate any
} suggestions. We would prefer not to get a dye-sub printer due to the
} high costs of printing. I understand that there are 1800 dpi laser
} printers available, could someone point out manufacturers for these
} machines?
}
} Supratik Guha
} Senior Materials Scientist
} 3M Corporate Research Labs.
}




From: NANCY SMITH :      NSMITH-at-darwin.sci.csuhayward.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 13:51:37 PSD8PDT
Subject: sem culture well

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Hello Joe:

When I want to process cells for SEM from 24 well culture dishes I
use a Bunsen burner and a scoopula (the curved metal device for
scooping out dry chemicals). First, the cells are fixed as usual with
glutaraldehyde then washed in buffer and distilled water. Then,
working within a fume hood and wearing a heatproof glove, the scoopula
is heated until red then touched to the underside of the culture dish.
The curved metal is about the right size for the 24 well dishes. It
takes 2 or 3 times to heat and cut until the whole bottom is
released. Once the initial cut is made you need to keep the cells wet
and this is easily done using a squirt bottle of distilled water.
This technique does not appear to cause damage to the cells but we
normally look at the more centrally positioned cells to avoid any
artefacts. Hope this helps.

Nancy Smith
Cal State Hayward
nsmith-at-csuhayward.edu




From: Eric Wang :      ewang-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 15:07:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Electron mean free path

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X-Sender: ewang-at-hardy.u.washington.edu

Hello, everyone:
Does anyone know where I can find some reference on measurement
of electron mean free path of different materials? The mean free path I
mean here is the mean free path for measuring the thickness when doing
EELS, so this includes electrons of all the energy losses rather than one
particular energy loss. We are particularly interested in getting the
right electron mean free path for Chrome Oxide and evaporated Carbon.
Thanks a lot.

Eric Wang
FB-10 Roberts Hall
Univ. of Washington
Seattle. Wa 98195
(206) 543-1514




From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 16:49:15 +1100
Subject: SEM well plates

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Message-Id: {199502150442.RAA12340-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

)Joe,
} Subject: SEM well plates

} Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture plates would be greatly
} } appreciated.
} Joe
} Joseph A. DeMaro

Depending on what exactly it is you are doing, how about using Thermanox
(Thermonox?) plastic slides on the bottom of the wells - they make them
specially to fit into the wells of 12 well plates and possibly the 24 well
ones too. They come sterilised and you just pop them into the well before
you add medium and cells and remove later, fix, dry etc and mount on a
stub. The slide surface properties are supposed to duplicate the ordinary
well bottoms.
Its easier than cutting wells out of the bottom of the trays.
Regards R Easingwood

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254






From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 01:11:08 -0500
Subject: Subscribe

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Please Subscribe




From: Rich2442-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 02:45:32 -0500
Subject: Request to join mailing list

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I work for an OEM of scanning electron microscopes and am interested in
keeping up with the latest technology and issues. I would like to subscribe
to the mailing list. Could you please let me know what I need to do.




From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 08:41:37 EST
Subject: Cell culture plates

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We process a considerable number of cell cultures for both SEM and TEM,
and have found what we consider to be the ideal system. For this purpose,
we have our investigators culture their cells in Leighton tubes...these
are cell culture tubes with a flat bottom which holds a long, narrow
plastic coverslip. Once the cells are attached, the medium is replaced
with fixative, then the coverslip (which is attached to a nifty little
handle) is removed. The plastic on the coverslip is impervious to all
solvents used in microscopy, and can be embedded and sectioned for TEM.

I wouldn't think of doing it any other way.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Fermin, Cesar :      Fermin.Cesar-at-tmc.tulane.edu
Date: 15 Feb 1995 09:37:10 -0600
Subject: Beseler Enlarger tune-up

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ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.

We have two Beseler enlarger needing adjustments. Any information
on available service person in the south, please remit details
directly to me. Number I called was disconnected!

************************************************************
*Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D \|*|/ Fax (504) 587-7389 *
*Tulane Medical School /|*|\ Answ. Mach.(504) 584-2618 *
*Pathology/SL79 \|*|/ Secretary (504) 584-2436 *
*New Orleans, La 70 112 /|*|\ Lab (504) 5841 *
*Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu -} Director of Morphological Services*
************************************************************




From: dhoyle-at-tic.ab.ca (David Hoyle)
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 10:59:42 -0700
Subject: registration

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Message-Id: {25021509453900-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

Thank you for responding so quickly to my inquiry.
I look forward to your news letters and hope to be able to
contribute any information I can.

Subscribe Microscopy dhoyle.tic.ab.ca





From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 11:24:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Beseler Enlarger tune-up

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Back around '82 or '83 I found that I had a problem with my Besseler's
constantly slipping focus just a tiny bit. So I put pipe clamps (those
metal rings that can be tightened of loosened with the turn a a screw) on
the metal guides for the focus which I would tighten when focusing the
bellows particulalry tight.
-mc

On 15 Feb 1995, Fermin, Cesar wrote:
} ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.






From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 13:37:13 EST
Subject: Leighton Tubes

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For those interested, Leighton tubes for cell culture are manufactured by
Corning Costar and are available from Fisher Scientific (Cat.# 07-200-
367). They appear in the 95-96 catalog on page 721.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 15:14:40 EST
Subject: Re: Electron mean free path

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Dear Eric,
If no expert in the field has a table of the mfp's, I can fax you
tables of stopping powers for electrons in carbon, oxygen, iron & titanium--
you have to interpolate for chromium and calculate the mpf from dE/dx. Good
luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 08:42:49 -0500
Subject: FIXATION OF TESTES FOR HISTOLOGY

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GREETINGS,

DOES ANYONE KNOW OF A BETTER FIXATIVE FOR TESTES THAN BOUINS FOR
LIGHT MICROSCOPY? WE ARE TRYING TO AVOID THE LONG RINSING REQUIRED WITH
BOUINS.

THANK YOU!

BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ
(201) 579-4343
(201) 570-4211 (FAX)

E-MAIL:
MAIL/ADMD=TELEMAIL/PRMD=SCHERING-PLOUGH/PN=BARBARA.HARTMAN/C=US/-at-SPRINT.COM






From: SiSTek-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 13:48:59 -0500
Subject: Need TEM / Many thanks!!

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Many thanks to all who responded for my call for help with locating TEM
service near us in the Phoenix metro area. As we thought, there is an
established group in Phoenix who have been around for a few years and who
provide TEM services.

For anyone else who might be interested, the company is called NanoTEM, Inc,
7620 E. McKellips Rd., Suite 4109, Scottsdale, Arizona 85257, phone 602 759
2808, fax 602 947 7615.

Again, many thanks for all your help.

Mark Anderson, SiSTek




From: baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tobias Baskin)
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 1995 13:47:11 -0600
Subject: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Greetings,
Is there something out there that will make a thin film that
isn't formvar? I have been using wire loops coated with a film of 1.2%
formvar to support my small samples during rapid freezing and substitution.
This works fine for acetone substitution but we would like to try
Tetrahydrafuran (THF) as a substitution medium and, alas, THF eats the
formvar.

We get a formvar film on the wire loop by casting small rectangles
of formvar on water and then trasfering one to a loop.

Are there other compounds that could be used to make a film across
the loop and that might survive THF??

Thanks for any suggestions,

Tobias Baskin

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
___ ____ ^ ____ _____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ / University of Missouri
/ | / / \ / / Biological Sciences
/___ / /__ /_____\ / /__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ ( / Columbia, MO 65211 USA
/ / / \ \ / voice: 314-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \____/ /_____ fax: 314-882-0123






From: Liang, Long :      LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM
Date: 17 Feb 1995 14:34:14 CST
Subject: Sample Prep--Steel

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Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.644426140095048FMACMS-at-IS.ARCO.COM}


Dear Microscopists,

I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

Your help is high appreciated.

Long Liang
ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab
Plano, TX
LLIANG-at-is.arco.com






From: Doug Arrell :      ARRELL-at-jrc.nl
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 08:25:04 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Sample Prep--Steel

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950220082504.256-at-FS-IAM-1.JRC.NL}

}
} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

I have always stuck to the simple silicon carbide paper (in steps
from 120 to 1200 grade) and then diamond (6,3,1um) route, and found
no problems with that.

Doug

+------------------------------------+
| Dr Douglas Arrell |
| Mechanical Performance and Joining |
| Institute for Advanced Materials |
| 1755 ZG Petten |
| Netherlands |
| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |
| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |
| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
+------------------------------------+




From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 11:10:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: student microscopy competition

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CALL FOR PAPERS
STUDENT COMPETITION
TO BE HELD AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
WHITEWATER, WISCONSIN
Friday, March 24, 1994
AWARDS:
FIRST PLACE $100
SECOND PLACE $75
THIRD PLACE $25
Abstracts will be published in Midwest Microscopy.
Microsgraphs from first place winner will be on the cover of Midwest
Microscopy.
Students will be judged on written abstract, presentation, and quality of
study.
Student competition is open to undergraduate and graduate students and
may involve any type of microscopy.
Student and sponsoring faculty member must be members of MSEM.
Abstracts should be submitted before March 15 to :
Dr. Lance Urven
University of Wisconsin- Whitewater
800 West Main,Whitewater, WI 53190





From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 20 Feb 1995 12:02:20 -0400
Subject: TEM: Metals,Electropolishing

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Message-ID: {n1418836731.26217-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time:
11:59 AM

Date:2/20/95
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html NC EMAL

I have some colleagues that want to electropolish some fairly heavily
deformed steel. Composition is:
0.4% C
0.6-0.9%Si
22-24%Cr
7-9%Ni
Trace N
Balance Fe.
Does anyone have a good starting solution and condidtions for this alloy?
Many Thanks.
John Mansfield.





From: tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 13:23:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Sample Prep--Steel

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} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?

A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel by
use of a colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with 9.8pH].
Dampen the cloth [such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;
apply liberal amount of the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the
cloth, and apply firm pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45
seconds, rotating the sample quite abit. A final word of caution:
this solution [Mastermet], besides having the high pH [rough on skin],
will crystallize into small, -very hard- particles. Is therefore highly
advised to filter the solution a few times into a smaller bottle before
each use. Have found this stuff to be -very- effective tho'. LECO also
has a similar solution, but have not used it enough to get comfortable
with it as the Mastermet.

In the previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC papers, then
a 9, 6, 1, & sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for the
rough polish (9 & 6), and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on
the grade and condition of the steel tho'... [all these recommendations
are based on me hand polishing individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a
ring held in hand]

Hope this helps,
-Rob
PS: I have no ties with Buehler, just a satisfied customer for +10 years.
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
| tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 20 Feb 95 16:15:25 EST
Subject: Polishing Steel/Colloidal Silica

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The techniques described by Rob Tayloe are certainly in agreement with the
references I have for polishing steel and will work quite well. The only note
I would make is that we do supply a Colloidal Silica which DOES NOT CRYSTALLIZE.
This is an important feature as Rob has mentioned because the crystallized
particles can be a real problem if you do not realize they are there.

Our Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica is available as follows:

Part No. Description Price
CS1-16 Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica 16 oz bottle $16.00
CS1-128 " " " 1 gallon bottle 78.00

If you'd like more information (MSDS etc) on this prodcut or any of our other
products, please let me know.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu (Steve Barlow)
Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 15:01:32 -0800
Subject: Tem: insect heart

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one of my users is looking at TEM of insect heart. Does anyone have some good
references on insect heart ultrastructure? Some of the cells associated with
the heart appear highly vesiculated at the cell periphery. The morphology of
these cells looks good, so we don't feel these stuctures are an artifact, but
we have so far been unable to identify what kind of cell or cell type it might
be. Can anyone suggest a reference or an investigator we could contact in
this regard?

----------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
San Diego CA 92182-0057
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu





From: SUSAN R. SESACK :      SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 08:45:41 EDT
Subject: enrollment

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Message-Id: {25022013111522-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

Dear Colleagues,

Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
obliged.

S.




From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG :      RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 9:41:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: enrollment

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} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:
}
} Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
} the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
} obliged.


To subscribe, please send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"
with "Subscribe Microscopy your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.

Holland Cheng
--------------------
Structural Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
Purdue University
W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1101

InterNet: rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu




From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG :      RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 10:03:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE: enrollment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:
}
} Would someone please provide me with instructions for enrolling in
} the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy? Much
} obliged.


To subscribe, please send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"
with "Subscribe Microscopy your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.


Btw, can someone in the server fix the returning route so that
the reply can a global one? I would like to be on a list that
I can see discussions (questions and answers) rather than a
collection of of questions. Thanks in advance!


Holland Cheng
--------------------
Structural Biology
Department of Biological Sciences
Purdue University
W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1101

InterNet: rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu




From: cel1-at-Lehigh.EDU (Charles Lyman)
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 11:44:22 -0500
Subject: Preparing polished sections of steel samples for EPMA analysis

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++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++I would like to add a small point about polishing specimens for
analysis in the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). I prefer to leave the
scratches in from the 1/4micron diamond polishing step in order to have an
image feature on which to focus with the light optics. Since quantitative
x-ray microanalysis samples should be flat-polished but unetched, it is
hard to find a suitable surface feature to use for focusing without these
fine scratches. For some reading on this, try Chapter 11 of Goldstein et
al., Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, 2nd edition,
Plenum Press, 1992.

Good luck, Prof. C E Lyman

Electron Optics Lab
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18015
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

} } I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples for EPMA
} } analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,
} } fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?
}
} A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel by
} use of a colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with 9.8pH].
} Dampen the cloth [such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;
} apply liberal amount of the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the
} cloth, and apply firm pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45
} seconds, rotating the sample quite abit. A final word of caution:
} this solution [Mastermet], besides having the high pH [rough on skin],
} will crystallize into small, -very hard- particles. Is therefore highly
} advised to filter the solution a few times into a smaller bottle before
} each use. Have found this stuff to be -very- effective tho'. LECO also
} has a similar solution, but have not used it enough to get comfortable
} with it as the Mastermet.
}
} In the previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC papers, then
} a 9, 6, 1, & sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for the
} rough polish (9 & 6), and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on
} the grade and condition of the steel tho'... [all these recommendations
} are based on me hand polishing individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a
} ring held in hand]






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 13:19:07 EST
Subject: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Dear Tobias,
A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-cleaved mica--should do the
trick. After evaporation, float the film onto water and pick it up with the
loop. You may have to experiment with thickness etc. to get the proper mech-
anical strength, but it should certainly survive the THF. You may also want
to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the carbon film is not strong enough.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: {tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 2-21-95 1:51pm
Subject: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films

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Message-Id: {9502212303.AA26486-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films
Orig-Author: {tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Dear Tobias,
A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-cleaved mica--should do the
trick. After evaporation, float the film onto water and pick it up with the
loop. You may have to experiment with thickness etc. to get the proper mech-
anical strength, but it should certainly survive the THF. You may also want
to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the carbon film is not strong enough.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tiv





From: Dave DeFily :      defily-at-tam2000.tamu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 1995 13:41:26 -0600
Subject: graphs to data

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Matthias -

I've done this quickly with "Image" by measuring the distance from the graph
axis (x or y) to the data points in question. To calibrate (pixels to data
units), just measure the distance between axis values.

-Dave defily-at-tamu.edu





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 1995 15:45:00 +0001 (EST)
Subject: Re: New SEM any Suggestions??

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Mark,

We published an article last Fall on the criteria and process for
purchasing an SEM. Readers tell us it is useful.

Suggest you or your friend call for more information.

Ellie Solit,
Executive Editor, Microscope Technology & News.
800-440-0311


On Wed, 22 H
Feb 1995 Noonan_Eddie/perth-at-perth.atd.cra.com.au wrote:

} I have been asked by a colleague of mine who at present does not have
} access to the Microscopy Listserver and who presently is sourcing a
} new SEM for his lab to put out the following question.
}
} "In the next few weeks I shall be ordering a new analytical SEM. We
} will use this SEM almost exclusively for EDS analysis. A motorised
} stage will also be required for the SEM to accommodate overnight runs.
} Therefore I require an ultra stable, reliable instrument. If any one
} with experience in this area has any thoughts I would be grateful to
} hear from you."
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Mark Stewart
}
} Replies to: ejn-at-perth.atd.cra.com.au
}




From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:24:26
Subject: Re: Fixation of blood cells

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To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov






From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:29:17
Subject: Re: Blood fixation

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To: microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

Jan Coetzee and Philip Oshel have posted about blood fixation but I havn't
seen any replies on this topic. We have a project that will try to tie
distortion of red cells to heat stress so fixation needs to be as artefact
free as we can get it. Please Jan or Philip can you mail me with the best
method you can recommend?

Mel Dickson, Univ. of NSW

m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au




From: Glenn Holm :      KARUZIS-at-wccf.mit.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 00:27:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 3 questions

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3 separate requests for information:

1) In the February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's
a blurb for a "Probe Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by
Grace Bio-Labs. Anyone have experience with these and/or a contact
phone/fax # for Grace Bio-Labs?

2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold Silver (LM)
immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second antigen.
The silver was originally present, but faded out in the second reaction.
Could have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were wondering
is - is it possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium thiosulfate
"fixer" step after the IGSS to protect it in subsequent immunoreactions,
dehydrating and coverslipping? Any practical suggestions would be appre-
ciated.

3) A colleague in Australia wants to purchase an antiserum to met-
enkephalin. We have been buying from Incstar and getting good results,
but the Australian distributor for Incstar charges outrageous prices.
Does anyone know of an alternate antibody supplier that may be less ex-
pensive for Australian customers?

------------------------------------------------------------------
|Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |
|M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |
|Cambridge, MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
------------------------------------------------------------------





From: KAKER-at-ctklj.ctk.si
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 8:13:54 +0100 (WET)
Subject: Coster-Kronig

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Dear Microscopists,

I am looking for Coster-Kronig transition probabilities for M lines.

Henrik Kaker
SEM/EDS Lab
Metal d.o.o.
62390 Ravne
Slovenia

Kaker-at-Ctklj.ctk.si




From: Kathy Walters :      kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 08:20:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: lipid sizing

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Recently I posted a request for methods for lipid sizing. I have put
together a summary of that request. If anyone would like a copy I will be
happy to send you one, but it is rather lengthy for the listserver.

Thanks to all respondents,

Kathy Walters






From: Marc Brande :      brande-at-sdsc.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 09:25:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: 3 questions

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ProbeClip

GBL inc. 1-800-813-7339 810-332-7100

Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu
San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830


On Thu, 23 Feb 1995, Glenn Holm wrote:

} 3 separate requests for information:
}
} 1) In the February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's
} a blurb for a "Probe Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by
} Grace Bio-Labs. Anyone have experience with these and/or a contact
} phone/fax # for Grace Bio-Labs?
}
} 2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold Silver (LM)
} immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second antigen.
} The silver was originally present, but faded out in the second reaction.
} Could have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were wondering
} is - is it possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium thiosulfate
} "fixer" step after the IGSS to protect it in subsequent immunoreactions,
} dehydrating and coverslipping? Any practical suggestions would be appre-
} ciated.
}
} 3) A colleague in Australia wants to purchase an antiserum to met-
} enkephalin. We have been buying from Incstar and getting good results,
} but the Australian distributor for Incstar charges outrageous prices.
} Does anyone know of an alternate antibody supplier that may be less ex-
} pensive for Australian customers?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} |Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |
} |M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |
} |Cambridge, MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
}






From: Dave L Robinson :      robin019-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 13:20:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: How do I subscribe?

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How do I subscribe to this newsgroup?

Thank you!

Dave Robinson
University of Minnesota

robin019-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu




From: nee-at-beta.lanl.gov (Norman Elliott)
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700
Subject: TEM negatives

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Dear list,

I believe this question was asked on this list before, so I am
sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is having problems with
negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010 TEM. JEOL
suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but is
really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently when
atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of the
static discharge problem and/or have a practical solution.




Norman Elliott | E-mail: nee-at-lanl.gov
Los Alamos National Lab | Fax: 505-665-2104
MST-7 MS E549 | Voice: 505-667-1587
Los Alamos, NM 87545 |






From: KJMcCarthy :      KJMCCARTHY-at-bmg.bhs.uab.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 15:08:07 CST+6CDT
Subject: Digital Imaging Microscopy/FTP site

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950223140219.480-at-bmg.bhs.uab.edu}

I would like to announce the establishment of an FTP site for the Macintosh/Power PC
based digital imaging microscopy software IPLabspectrum from Signal Analytics
Corporation. There are several reasons for development of this site:
1. To provide individuals interested in developing a digital imaging microscopy system
a chance to access and download demonstration versions of this particular
Macintosh/PowerPC based digital imaging software for evaluation purposes.

2. To provide users of IPLabspectrum software for a site to download and upload
user-generated system extensions and scripts .

Although the software is from a commercial source, the establishment of the FTP site
was a decision by made by myself and other users of the Digital Imaging Microscopy
Facility here at the University of Alabama at Birmingham as one way of promoting the
digital imaging microscopy as a research tool. Signal Analytics Corporation, the
developers of the software, has generously made available demonstration versions of their
entire software line for FTP download purposes. If any other developers of imaging
software wish to use this site as a repository for demonstration versions of their software I
would be more than happy to accomodate them.

The demonstration versions of this software are organized into several folders, and
separated into Macintosh and PowerPC versions of that software. There are versions of the
software that support specific imaging boards (e.g. Scion LG-3) in the demo folders. Also in
the site are demo versions of calcium ratio (IPLab Ratio), Three Dimension Reconstruction,
and Multiprobe (FISH) extensions. In addition is a separate program for reading scanned
images of electrophoretic gels. (IP Lab Gel)

There is a folder (directory) for Uploading of Scripts, Extensions, Messages, ect.
provided-however the caveat there is that downloading the extensions from that
directory is at your own risk, since this is a public access directory. If you choose to
download from this directory, please take the time to scan the files for viruses or other
nasties. Our aim is to monitor the upload directory as the usage increases, test the material
in the directory for problems (bugs, viruses, and other annoying creatures) and then shift
those programs that we consider problem free to a specific download-only directory. At
present this download-only directory for user-uploaded files does not exist.

To access the site use the address FTP.BMG.UAB.EDU, logon as ANONYMOUS to enter the
public directory. In the directory is a subdirectory (folder) IP_Labspectrum. Within this
subdirectory are other directories containing the various demos of the software. I also
included the shareware programs FETCH and BinHex 5.0 in a directory named
FTP_SITE_Utilities for individuals (like myself) who rather use FETCH as a front end for
FTP browsing and transfer.

This site is still undergoing development, so please forgive the style of organization. Any
comments, suggestions, ect. about the site, digital imaging microscopy would be greatly
appreciated. My e-mail address is KJMcCarthy-at-CellBio.BMG.UAB.EDU

Best Regards
Kevin McCarthy
Assistant Professor
Department of Cell Biology
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama 35294
Phone 205-934-9923/9924
Fax 205-934-7029




From: Leo D Frawley 03 5667464 :      FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:44:58 +1100
Subject: Extraction Replicas MnS ppts.

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Return-Receipt-To: FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Registered-Mail-Reply-Requested-By: FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN.MUAS; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:44:58 +1100
Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:59:09 +1100
Disclose-Recipients: prohibited

I am interested in using an extraction replica technique to determine MnS precipitate size distributions in a
TEM.

The technique being considered is as follows:
-Polish sample
-Etch to give some surface relief
-Carbon coat
-Using blade cut 1mm size grid on surface
-Release carbon film containing ppt's. from surface using etchant
-Wash carbon replica in alcohol and water
-Position on TEM grid.

My problem is finding an etchant that will not attack the very small MnS ppts. It has been reported that some
etchants attack the Mn in these ppt's.

Any suggestions on the technique or the etchant would be appreciated.

Regards Leo D Frawley
frawley-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au







From: peter smith :      PS-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 16:20:57 EST-10
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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} Date sent: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: nee-at-beta.lanl.gov (Norman Elliott)
} Subject: TEM negatives

} Dear list,
}
} I believe this question was asked on this list before, so I am
} sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is having problems with
} negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010 TEM. JEOL
} suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but is
} really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently when
} atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of the
} static discharge problem and/or have a practical solution.
}
}
We had this static discharge problem when first we bought our
2010. It was solved when JEOL replaced the Teflon drive gear (large)
in the camera with a conducting (metal) one. Coating the gear with a
conducting spray didn't work!
We also installed a separate vacuum desiccator for the plates
(diffusion pump and liquid nitrogen trap).

Peter Smith ps-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au
RMIT App Physics Ph: (03) 660 3390 Office
GPO Box 2476V (03) 660 2205 Lab
Melbourne Fax: (03) 660 3837
Vic 3001
AUSTRALIA







From: NICK SCHRYVERS :      nick_schryvers-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: 24 Feb 1995 10:27:10 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Message-Id: {n1418500529.67061-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be}

REGARDING Re} TEM negatives

About your discharge problem, we believe this is indeed strongly linked with
the vacuum. Therefore we always use one or more desicators before the plates
enter the microscope. This way also the vacuum in the microscope restores
faster. The problem also depends on the plates: we had the experience that
Ilford plates always gave discharge, while Kodak and Agfa did not in the same
environment. Also handling of the plates can be important: sliding plates
over one another can cause discharges before and after use in the microscope.
Hope this can be of help,
Nick Schryvers





From: Larry Hawkey :      hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 08:50:07 -0500
Subject: RE>EM negatives

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I had some static discharge problems with my JEOL 1200exII
some time ago. Every 8th to 10th neg had streaks on
it. they were thin and sharp with two or three finger
like projections coming fron the same point. The service
tech. cleaned the camera (several times) and that cleared the
problem up. It did take several tries and return trips to
get the dirt (thought to be a metal fragment) cleaned up.

I hope this helps.
Larry Hawkey
hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
919-641-6425




From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 07:48:30 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Norman,
Although I am not familiar w/ this particular model of JEOL, could it be
possible that the static discharge is occuring before or (more likely)
after the film has gone into/come out of the scope? We had an individual
in the lab I was in before who tended to wear synthetic fabrics and on
particularly dry Arizona days they could really ZAP the film. One
solution is to wear a wrist grounding strap when handling the film (like
the kind that people are supposed to wear when working inside their
computers). Hope this helps.
Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(602)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: :      Image-at-beelzebub.ucsf.EDU
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 22:36:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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subscribe







From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 10:28:53 EST
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Dear Norman,
We, too, have had occasional problems with static discharges on our
films--especially with LoDose, which is very sensitive to light. Our worst
problems occur when the humidity is low. You must be very careful when sepa-
rating films from the stack and when removing the stack from the package. You
might also check if your lab coats produce static electricity--we just got new
polyester coats which are terrific generators. If you are completely dark-ad-
apted and loading the folm in total darkness, you can see the discharges as
they occur, so at least you will know what is going on. [oops, I meant film]
If your desiccant is too efficient, the discharge problem will be worse. Good
luck, sometimes the procedures necessary to prevent these discharges are te-
dious. If all else fails, try using 4489 film--it's not nearly as sensitive
as SO163, but it is much finer grain and gives excellent images. We've never
had discharge problems with it, probably because discharges are not intense
enough to show up.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: dlmedli-at-california.sandia.gov (medlin douglas l)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 09:11:50 -0800
Subject: Re: em negatives

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In the past we too have had problems with static discharge ruining negatives
(the film was SO163 being used in a JEOL 4000EX). We found that
the discharges were coming from our vinyl gloves; when we switched to
cotton gloves the problem went away. Additionally, when loading
the camera we never use pre-dessicated film, but instead load the
camera with film that has been at atmosphere (and warmed up to room
temperature if it's been in the refrigerator). We then dessicate the camera
box prior to putting it in the microscope.

On a related topic, on occasion we've observed a fine network of cracks in
the emulsion of our SO163 film. Under an optical microscope the film
looks similar to a dried out mud flat with cracks spaced rougly
0.05 mm apart. These cracks would appear regardless of whether
we dried the film at room temperature overnight or in a heated film drier.
The cracking also appeared with both new and old chemicals (D19 diluted
2:1 4 minutes; kodak rapid fixer 5 minutes). Thinking we had a bad
batch of film we sent some of the material to Kodak, but they were
unable to duplicate the effect. Finally, it was suggested that we
reduce the concentration of hardener in the fixer to half of what
Kodak recommends. This seems to have reduced the cracking quite a bit, although
not entirely. Has anyone had similar problems?

+---------------------------------------------+
! Douglas L. Medlin !
! Physical Properties of Materials Department !
! Mail Stop 9402 !
! Sandia National Laboratories !
! Livermore, California 94551 !
! !
! (510) 294-2825 !
! dlmedli-at-california.sandia.gov !
+---------------------------------------------+
.\




From: Glenn Poirier :      GLENN_P-at-GEOSCI.Lan.McGill.CA
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 13:51:56 EST5EDT
Subject: anhydrous polishing

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Message-Id: {199502241853.NAA28700-at-sifon.CC.McGill.CA}

Greetings Microscopists

Is there anyone out there who has any tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic
material for microanalysis. Specifically, I need to polish some CaO
particles with CaC rinds. I could probably polish them with silicone
oil, but how do I get the oil off the samples before I put them in
the microprobe? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Glenn
**********************************************************************
* Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *
* Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *
* Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *
* McGill University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *
* Montreal, Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *
**********************************************************************




From: Po-Fu Huang :      huang020-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 13:14:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: literature needed

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Greetings,

I am a graduate student currently working on a project utilizing EDS to
get quantitative elemental information of atmospheric particles. In past
few monthes, I have been trying to get hold of a article cited below through
the interlibrary service and without any success. It will be greatly
appreciated if anyone out there can direct me where and how to get this
article.

Heinrich, K. F. J. (1987) "Mass Absorption Coefficients for Electron Probe
Microanalysis." in
"Proc. 11th Int. Cong. on X-ray Optics and Microanalysis." edited by J.
Brown and R. Packwood, published by J. D. Brown, University of Western,
Ontario, pp67-119.


Po-Fu Huang
Particle Technology Laboratory
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Minnesota
(Office) (612) 626-7227
(Lab) (612) 625-7307
(Fax) (612) 625-6069





From: hukee.margaret-at-mayo.EDU (Marge Hukee)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:10:12 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM negatives

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Message-Id: {9502242007.AA12178-at-fermat.Mayo.EDU}
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We pre-pump negatives in a separate vacuum chamber with phosphorus
pentoxide powder placed in the bottom of chamber. This film is loaded into
a spare cassette and has always been suitable for use after being pumped
for 1-2 hours or left under vacuum. After about a week, the powder absorbs
moisture and must be replaced. The old powder can be neutralized with NaOH
pellets and when NaOH pellets have dissolved, can be discarded by flushing
with water.

Marge Hukee
EM Core Facility hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Mayo Foundation (507) 284-3148
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--






From: John F. Conroy :      John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues

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Hello,

I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I have been knocking my head
against the wall looking for some sort of data on the optical transmission
properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone have a good
reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain tissue
slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
oximetry.).

Thanks in advance,

John Conroy
University of Utah
Dept. Bioengineering




From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
Date: 24 Feb 1995 17:10:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: EM negatives

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We had some static discharge on our 35 mm film in the past. It
occurred when pre-desiccated bulk was being rolled onto
cassettes. The problem disappeared after bulk film was left in
atmosphere. We never had problem with plates because we did not
pre-desiccate plates. One may try leaving the exposed plates in a
humid chamber for a while before developing them, if the problem
persisted.

Ann Fook Yang




From: emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:28:17 -0800
Subject: LKB Ultratome III

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Greetings:

I have an LKB Ultratome III that is surplus to our needs. Purchased in
1978, almost never used. If you might be interested in making an offer or
know of a worthwhile place for a donation, please let me know.

Thanks,


Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy and Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu
(408) 459-2477






From: Maggy Piranian :      maggy-at-sparky2.esd.mun.ca
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 17:46:50 -0330 (NST)
Subject: Re: anhydrous polishing

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Glenn (and others)
I have polished B2O3 with the 3M lapping film and no water. It
doesn't produce a great polish, but you can usually find a few spots
where you can squeeze a beam in. If you don't use the 3M film, let me
know and I'll tell you where you can get some or even send you a scrap.
Maggy Piranian
M.U.N.

On Fri, 24 Feb 1995, Glenn Poirier wrote:

} Greetings Microscopists
}
} Is there anyone out there who has any tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic
} material for microanalysis. Specifically, I need to polish some CaO
} particles with CaC rinds. I could probably polish them with silicone
} oil, but how do I get the oil off the samples before I put them in
} the microprobe? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance
}
} Glenn
} **********************************************************************
} * Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *
} * Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *
} * Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *
} * McGill University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *
} * Montreal, Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *
} **********************************************************************
}




From: Miguel Avalos B. :      miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 19:51:33 -0800
Subject: Re: LKB Ultratome III

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From: smithj-at-acad.winthrop.edu
Date: Sat, 25 Feb 1995 20:55:59 -0500
Subject: Problems with 35mm T-max in TEM

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EM folk:
I'm trying to use T-max 100 in the 35mm camera on
my Zeiss EM 10C. Everything works well (you get nice
short exposures, and this particular camera can be
handled in the light, so there's no problem with using
a panchromatic film).
But the film gets *BRITTLE* in high vacuum. I have
snapped the film in half simply by bending it as I
unloaded the camera. Any hints, or do I just need to
switch to one of the orthochromatic films? If so, which
one(s) have you tried and liked?
Julian Smith III
Biology
Winthrop University
Rock Hill, SC
803-323-2111 (vox)





From: Dirk Knoesen, UWC, SA :      DIRK-at-physics.uwc.ac.za
Date: 27 Feb 95 08:45:52 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: TEM film

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950227084552.256-at-physics.uwc.ac.za}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

Douglas Medlin wrote about fine cracks appearing on some of their TEM
negatives. I believe you are experiencing what photographers called
:crazing:. This is an effect that occurs when the temperature of the
developer and fixer is not the same, or at least the difference is
not small enough. It is exactly as you describe it, a fine line
structure on the film that looks that mud cracks.

Dirk Knoesen
Department of Physics, University Western Cape, Bellville, 7530
South Africa
e-mail: dirk-at-physics.uwc.ac.za
Phone: (+21) 959 2236 Fax: (+21) 959 3474




From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
Date: 27 Feb 1995 09:30:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: RE:35mm film in TEM

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We use Eastman motion picture film (5302 fine grain release
positive film) in Philips EM300 in the past and currently in
Zeiss EM902 without any problem.

Ann Fook Yang




From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 27 Feb 95 12:12:22 EST
Subject: anhydrous polishing/Abrasive Films

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One suggestion I would make would be polishing with abrasive lapping films.
These are abrasive particles which are bonded to a polyester film. It is a
higher grade of traditional SiC grinding paper and it comes in micronized
particle sizes. The material is designed to be used either with or without a
lubricant which should take care of your problem.

While it is always preferable to polish with some sort of lubricant, this is a
viable alternative for anhydrous materials. I must also add that the lapping
film is one of our products so I do have a vested interest in this suggestion.
If you would like a sample to try out, please contact me. It is avaialable in
Aluminum oxide down to .05 micron and in Diamond down to 0.1 micron. Typical
price for Al2O3 film is about $1.39 per 8" PSA Disc and for Diamond about $24
per 8" PSA disc. 8" Plain Back Diamond Film is more typically used and is
priced at about $20 per 8" Disc. Prices, of course, will decrease in quantity.
The diamond plain back films are used extensively in Tripo Polishing for SEM and
TEM applications.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499






From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:50:49
Subject: Re: RE:35mm film in TEM

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To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov


I have used Kodak Fine Grain Release Positive (5302) in Philips microscopes
for 30 years. Never gave a problem with cracking with the unperforated (no
longer available) or perforated stock. Gave some problems with "lightning
strikes" on the final 4-5 frames out of 40. Philips have special cameras with
large diameter hubs so the film is never bent much and used unperforated film
so there was no tendency to crack at perforations. A 35 mm camera in our
Hitachi H-7000 gives very fine cracking across the film between the edges of
the perforations even when using the film Hitachi recommends. This can only
be avoided by using film which is only JUST dry enough, shooting the whole
roll and processing it in about 4 hours.







From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 02:24:41 -0500
Subject: Materials Microscopy

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For your information, Materials Microscopy is a new newsletter dedicated to
the professional interests of the working materials microscopist. Those who
wish to receive a free subscription should provide us with their full mailing
address via FAX -at- (602) 947-7615 or E-mail: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com. Contributed
articles should be mailed to:
Materials Microscopy
P.O. Box 2014
Scottsdale, AZ 85252
Please contact me if you need any further information. Thank you.

Rene E. Nicholas
Circulation Manager
Materials Microscopy





From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 08:25:56 +0100 (MET)
Subject: for Barbara Hartmann

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Hi Barbara!
I tried to no avail to send you the present message at your email
address: it stubbornly bounced back, so I eventually post it to the
microscopy list.
I apologize to the members of this list if they should feel this is
wasting bandwidth: just delete and go on to the next message ;-)

Barbara!
I am afraid I did not make my question clear enough ;-)
What I wanted to know was:
1) the testes you wish to fix are from what species ?

2) for what kind of microscopy are they to be processed ? I.e.
T.E.M., S.E.M., or light microscopy ?

3) What's the embedding medium?

4) in the case of light microscopy, do you contemplate using some special
technique (besides for recognizing the different stages of the
seminiferous epithelium) which would require that some specific
chemical would be either required or, on the contrary, avoided?

In my personal experience with rat testes and light microscopy (this
is rather very long ago: more than 30 years! :-( ), Bouin and other
picric acid containing variations thereof are not optimal fixatives
for preservation of the acrosomial apparatus of spermatids, which is
one of the features used by most classification methods (Clermont's
among others...).
The best fixatives for light microscopy of paraffin embedded tissue
are those containing potassium dichromate such as, for example,
Helly's fluid (Zenker + formaldehyde), but they also are followed, after
rinsing and dehydration, by shrinkage which is still more important than
that observed after Bouin's or Bouin-Hollande's (somewhat better) fluids.

BTW, what's wrong with picric acid? It is always shipped in 'moist
condition' in order to minimize hazards. I work in our lab since 1953,
with Bouin, Bouin-Allen, Bouin-Hollande, Dubosq-Brazil etc., every day,
and we never experienced any problem. We store the picric acid for our
needs in the form of a saturated aqueous solution which keeps for as long
as you will. This stock solution is then used for preparing all picric
acid containing fixatives.

There is no point in trying to eliminate the picric acid from the fixed
pieces of tissue before sectioning. If the presence of picric acid in the
slides should hamper subsequent staining (a rare occurrence, btw), then
the easiest and expeditious way to get rid of it is to pretend your tissue
was fixed with a sublimate containing fluid: at the rehydration step, your
slides should undergo treatment by alcoholic iodine (or lugol solution) and
sodium thiosulfate in the usual way and 'voila': no more picric acid on the
slides within 2 minutes!
Under no circumstances should the pieces of tissue fixed with a picric
acid containing fixative undergo rinsing in water! This is sheer heresy ;-)
because it induces a lot of swelling in the tissue before shrinking even
more during dehydration (I never found out which histologist ever advocated
such method, but I know quite a number of renowned ones who firmly condemned
it, and with good reason). If you insist on rinsing the pieces of testes after
fixation, then merely increasing the number of steps through 90x alcohol should
do the trick; you may even add a thin layer (1-2 mm thick) of lithium
carbonate on the bottom of the alcohol containing flasks: this helps
dissolving part of the picric acid away.

Possibly the method which should yield the best pictures has been documented
in a book entitled 'Histological and histopathological Evaluation of the
Testis', by Russell,Ettlin, Sinha Hikim and Clegg: Cache River Press 1990,
(15777 Bolesta, Box 129, Clearwater, Fl 34620): ISBN 09627422-0-1.

At the end of the book, there is an appendix about the materials and methods
which you might find useful (although perfusion fixation of rat testes is
among the most frustrating experiences I ever had, even with a lot of
heparin ). This would also require embedding in epoxy resin and making large
semi-thin sections, which I don't know whether you are prepared to do ;).
Glutaraldehyde certainly seems to me the best choice, but then paraffin
embedding would be ruled out (too hard and too brittle after paraffin
embedding).
HTH, and good luck.
Let me know about the outcome (good, I hope)
John
(correction: alcohol above should read 90 percent in volume)



***********************************************************
* Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
* Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
* Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
* e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
* snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
* B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
***********************************************************




From: Ker{nen Jaakko-Tuomas :      jaakko-at-butler.cc.tut.fi
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:14:33 +0200
Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy

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Yes, I want more information about the Materials Microscopy. Please
send me a free subscription.

Jaakko Keranen
Centre for electron microscopy
Tampere Univ. of technology
P.O.Box. 589
FIN-33101 Tampere
FINLAND




From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:38:53 -0500
Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain

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To whomever,
Would someone please repost the recent info on lipid sizing (K.Walters?)
and the three responses on lipid negative staining. I had another crash and
lost
these responses.
Thanks
Mike D.





From: John F. Conroy :      John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950228091038.320-at-ahabs.wisc.edu}




Hello,

I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I have been knocking my head
against the wall looking for some sort of data on the optical transmission
properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone have a good
reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain tissue
slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
oximetry.).

Thanks in advance,

John Conroy
University of Utah
Dept. Bioengineering


Dear John,

It has been years since I worked in this area, but I suggest you might
look at the literature for the optical transmission properties of retina.
As a nervous tissue, its optical properties should be quite similar to the
CNS as long as the measurements are not made in the vicinity of the fovea.
And, of course, due the importance of retinal transparency for vision, its
optical properties must be well known. For a place to start I'd have a
look at the "Handbook of sensory physiology" Springer-Verlag.

Just my two cents worth, Steven
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steven L. Goodman, Ph.D.
Dept. Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences 608-262-0816 (office)
University of Wisconsin 608-262-7420 (FAX)
1655 Linden Drive
Madison, WI 53706 SLG-at-AHABS.WISC.EDU
--------------------------------------------------------------------------






From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:00:41 -0500
Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain

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} Return-Path: {delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} Received: from AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV by welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (5.0/SMI-SVR4)
} id AA04845; Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:52:41 -0500
} Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:38:53 -0500
} Message-Id: {9502281438.AA02618-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} X-Sender: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain
} X-Mailer: {Windows Eudora Version 1.4.2b16}
} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
}
} To whomever,
} Would someone please repost the recent info on lipid sizing
(K.Walters?)
} and the three responses on lipid negative staining. I had another crash and
} lost
} these responses.
} Thanks
} Mike D.
}
}





From: Miguel Avalos B. :      miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 10:37:19 -0800
Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy

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From: Damon Heer :      DLH-at-fei2.feico.com
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 16:07:22 -0800
Subject: Used SEM for sale

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NANOMETRICS QWIKSCAN II
FESEM

$4,900

If interested, please contact Paxton Hong
InnfoGraphics
503 235-0227

Best regards,
Damon Heer

FEI Company
7451 N.E. Evergreen Parkway
Hillsboro, OR 97124-5830

Phone (503) 640-7582
fax (503) 640-7509
email dlh-at-feico.com




From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 22:42:01 -0500
Subject: No link to Newsgroup

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Message-Id: {199503010340.WAA29098-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}
X-Sender: jfmjfm-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Just a note to let you guys know that our link from this mailing list to
the Usenet newsgroup sci.techniques.microscopy has been broken. The
gateway at
sci.techniques.microscopy.usenet-at-decwrl.dec.com has been closed down. Dec
no longer support it.
If you want as much coverage for you questions and posts as possible I
encourage you to post both to this list and also to the Newssgroup.

If anyone knows how to set up a mail gateway to the Newsgroup, and also
from the Newsgroup to the mailing list, I would be very interested to hear
how to do it so we could reestablish the link and possibly make it
bi-directional this time!

Many thanks
Jfm.


______________
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html






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